Archive for boston

Blindfold Bootleg Series: Trent Austin

Posted in Improvisation, Musical Influences with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 14, 2015 by pogo56

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Trent Austin is one of the great trumpeters of his (of any really) generation.  He’s one of those rare artists that can easily command the lead chair and turn around and improvise with the best of them.  And on top of that he’s recently opened one of the premier brass shops on the east coast and he makes marvelous mouthpieces.  As soon as he sent me one of his pieces to try out, set aside my Monette B2 of 12 years and haven’t picked it up since. Trent also works closely with the great Miel Adams!  Here’s what Trent had to say after hearing the examples:


Example 1
-Dave Douglas Live at R-bar

Dave Douglas

After:   Dave has always been one of my favorite players. I got this one in a few seconds due to his IMO very original sound, vibrato touches, and personal style.  His work is so incredibly diverse player who can jump over any style be it totally straight ahead to his work with John Zorn.  This one for me was a fairly easy one with some of his inflections he uses  that IMO are very much his own.   It was a fantastic example of how I should listen and transcribe him some more.  I love the way his compositional mind works during this improvisation. 

Example 2-Wynton live with Freddie Hubbard NYC

Wynton (trying to sound like Freddie) love the sound of the Bach!

After:   I have to admit hearing this before,  perhaps even from you.   It still got me for a few seconds.  I literally said out loud “That’s Freddie… oh wait, that’s Wynton”.  It’s pretty cool to hear him playing like this although at times it’s pretty disjointed.  His sound and control are constant reminders to me that he is still the hands down  best player in the world.  I especially love his sound and articulations on his Bach.  I personally feel coming from someone that makes equipment these days he had the best recorded sound speaking only on a “trumpet” side of things on the Bach.   While he’s such a deeper musician than he was in the early 80’s  I strongly feel that the Monette has hampered his tonal color spectrum on recordings.  Of course me critiquing the greatest player in the world is a bit silly so I’ll go back to my corner and practice my long tones 😉

Example 3-Ryan Kisor Live in Japan

Ryan Kisor

After:   One of my absolute favorite (if not my favorite player)  out there. I have not met many folks that can do what Ryan does. The fluency on those triplets!   Man  such amazing technique!  Perhaps Ryan  and Greg Gisbert are two of the most versatile cats out there who can literally sit in any chair and any musical situation regardless of style and crush it!  Was he playing cornet on this?  I don’t think so this sounds like a trumpet to my ears.  I know he’s recently been doing a lot of his solo work on an Olds Super Cornet lately and has inspired me to check out playing more cornet in my own work.  

Example 4-Tom Harrell with Johnathan Blake

Tom Harrell

After:  Genius… enough said… Every time I hear Tom I hear just how his complete melodic sense and compositional mind inspire me to seek out more of the inner lines  he plays. I have transcribed so much of Tom’s work and I think this one will be next on my list.  Listen to that space he uses.  A lot of folks listen to his latest playing and wish he would play more like the 70’s/early 80’s versions but for myself he’s playing so much more melodically!

Example 5-Keyon Harrold live in NYC

Josh Evans? (One Finger Snap… silly burning)

After: Bummed I didn’t get this but I know Keyon is one BADDDD  cat.  Such a titanic  solo full of virtuosity.    What an inspiration to listen to and get myself back in the practice room.  Keyon is someone more people should know about as he can hang with anyone for sure!

Example 6-Christian Scott Live at the R-Bar

Nick Payton (this one was particularly tough… not totally sure)

After:   AGH!   This one got me until I sent you my before and then I heard something in Christian’s tone and inflections  that made me pick up on him after sending you the before.  I didn’t think it was Nick but was fairly confident it was a New Orleans player.  The vibrato on the F on the second or third chorus gave it away to me.  I think there still is a lot to be said about regional styles and the influence the local traditions have on players.   It’s harder and harder to hear this in players today (both in improvisational music and orchestral style as we continually head to more homogenized sounds which in my opinion is  not a good thing).  Also didn’t think of Christian initially due to the fact his current music is so different than this clip.    He’s a wonderful cat,  great spokesman for the trumpet, and really a wonderful example of always committing yourself in the moment as I have never seen a bad performance from Christian.  He was one of the first guys to hip me to Adams and I am so thankful for that as it truly changed my life (Adams were the first company to urge me to start my business).

Example 7-Art Farmer live in NYC

Art Farmer

After:  Art  plays with so much and is a master of economy!   Great to hear him  (although I’m pretty sure he was playing the flumpet on this clip and I preferred him on the Besson flugel as again it had more  of a variety tonal spectrum) and how he winds through Recordame.  One of my heroes Herb Pomeroy always stressed finding the “sweet notes”  in a solo.  Those notes that  give you the most color for the chord or pivotal notes to signify harmonic motion.    Art was always someone I could hear that in.   Another thing I love about Art is that he never stopped shedding.  I met him near the end of his life and he told me he still spent numerous (3+ daily) in the shed.

Stay afloat with what’s going on in Trent’s career by visiting his website!!

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Blindfold Bootleg Series: Austin McMahon

Posted in Composition, Improvisation, Musical Influences, Performance with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 14, 2015 by pogo56

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I consider Austin to be one of the most talented, acute artists of my generation to sit at the drum throne. He’s got a great sophisticated touch on the set and as a horn player, he’s VERY easy to make music with because he has a strong set of musical ears. He also co-leads the Quartet of Happiness, one of the frontrunners in introducing children to thee are of jazz and improvisation in a fresh and interactive way! Here’s what Austin had to say after hearing the test examples:

Example 1-Clarence Penn in London with Jason Palmer and Cedric Hanriot’s City of Poets (2014)

1) I love the phrasing of this example. The drummer has such command of the time amidst this syncopated (yet spacious) vamp. Although the gestures are fragmented and largely occurring within the spaces of the accompaniment, the solo has a clear shape and direction to it. I particularly enjoy the superimposition of other meters/grooves and his sonic concept. Nowadays, it seems more and more drummers are utilizing “prepared” sounds like a heavily muffled snare or additional high-pitched auxiliary drum (as heard in this example) to add a little more color to the drummer’s palette. Based on this brief example I’m not certain who this drummer is and therefore would rather be surprised and hope to check them out more in the future!

After: Ah, yes, Clarence Penn. I actually thought of him for a second when I heard the splash cymbal but didn’t put all the pieces together. I love how he’s incorporated the roll of a percussionist into his drumset playing and utilizes auxiliary percussion like wood blocks or triangles in a tasteful way. Recently I’ve enjoyed his playing on several records and live performances in recent years specifically with Kate McGarry and Maria Schneider’s orchestra.

Example 2-Kendrick Scott Tribute to Herbie Hancock in NYC (year unknown)

2) This drum intro leaves me wondering many things. The vocabulary sounds heavily influenced by the great Roy Haynes but the tuning of the drums seems more contemporary. And, the extensive use of the hihat is not nearly as common amongst modern drummers as it once was. Though this may seem like a strange take on this example my honest guess is that this is an older drummer sitting in and playing someone else’s (modern) drums. (Again, I’m consciously choosing not to mention names for lack of certainty.) Either way, if it happens to be a younger drummer, I would applaud their dedication in studying the foundation of our idiom. In my opinion, this drummer has not cut corners to get to this level of playing.

After: I’m glad to hear this is Kendrick Scott. I love his playing and he is definitely a player who has done his share of studying the lineage of the drumset (thus fooling me into thinking he was an “older” drummer). He is quite a driving force in modern jazz and has had a big influence on my playing. I really love his “Oracle” group and how well constructed the music is – not just the drumming. He’s a fabulous musician.

Example 3-Jochen Ruechert in England (year unknown)

3) Wow, this drummer is so “inside” of the accompaniment that it seems uncanny. My feeling is that this drummer is also a composer (not of this example) and thus really understands the direction of the music and can dance around and within it very liberally. The solo also makes me think that this drummer is either an extremely good reader of difficulty music or has played this particular song many times, or both. It’s very interesting to me to try to make guesses at who this may be when I hear vocabulary and cymbal sound and drum tuning that’s used by lots of contemporary jazz drummers. If this were a studio album it’s possible that some of the subtleties/individualities would stand out to me but with live recordings a lot of that is lost. Whoever it is, I like it a lot and would assume this is a very busy hardworking drummer.

After: Jochen Rueckert is on my latest favorites. I’m a big fan of his playing with Marc Copland and his electronic music project “Wolff Parkinson White”. Sometimes when I’m listening to him I feel like there was a snapshot of jazz taken in the late 1960’s and he is building upon that style, approach and vocabulary. I mean that as the highest compliment since many drummers strive to achieve what drummers of that era were doing and I think Jochen understands that language deeply. That mixed with his fiery modern edge blend to create a very exciting and engaging approach to drumming.

Example 4-Marcus Gilmore in Boston with Nicholas Payton 5tet (year unknown)

4) I find it hard to hone in on an honest guess on this one because the sound of the cymbals and drums are obscured and sound compressed. The beginning is reminiscent of a free jazz approach to time playing like that of Paul Motian with a little more modern edge which, then leads more towards a more Tony William’s influenced approach to uptempo time playing. Overall, I don’t know who this is but, I feel this solo was inspired to a degree by Tony Williams. And again, the drummer has done their homework.

After: I still wouldn’t have been able to guess this was Marcus Gilmore but now I do hear some similarities in approach to some recordings of Vijay Iyer’s trio, which feature Marcus. I love the fluidity of his playing and how he makes time and grooves feel so liquid even in very complex meters and forms. When he plays drums I feel he evokes a true love of the instrument.

Example 5-Obed Calvaire in Cambridge with Kurt Rosenwinkel 5tet (year unknown)

5) This is the first time during this blindfold test that I will actually mention a name of who I think the drummer is. I don’t know many other drummers on the scene today with such command of the instrument and ability to build a solo to peak and continue pushing upwards from there. There is such musicality and technical mastery on display here. I love his sound as well. This must be Eric Harland.

After: Obed! I remember hearing his name when I was a student at the University of Miami in early 2000’s and he was at the New World School for the Arts High School. After that when he attended Manhattan School of Music he would come sit in at jam sessions when he was visiting Miami and blow people away with his feel. It wasn’t long before he was making waves in New York’s jazz scene. Wow, what a great player! I can only hope that he’d see it as a compliment that I thought he was Eric Harland. Both are fantastic drummers at the top of the game.

Example 6-Jamire Williams in NYC with Darren Barrett and Myron Walden

6) This is an enjoyable solo with some interesting push and pull on the time feel. There are moments of an almost exaggerated swing feeling as the drummer moves around the toms as Max Roach would but meanwhile a lot of heavy cymbals and Blakey like gestures. Again, I hear a young/contemporary drummer and strong influences from the hardbop era but I’m unable to pinpoint who this may be for sure.

After: I still wouldn’t have been able to get this one but since being given the answers to this blindfold test I’ve been exploring Jamire’s music and have really enjoyed what I’ve heard so far. I’m glad he’s on my radar now. He seems to be part of the new movement of drummers who have many other musical talents and knows how to use them to create truly fresh sounding new music.

Example 7-Jeff Ballard in London with Jason Palmer, Michael Janisch, and Julian Siegel.

7) Yes, I will name another name during this test because I have no doubts that this is the one and only Jeff Ballard. His sound and vocabulary are both so refined and individual. To me, his whole approach is unmistakable and so musical. This is what jazz drumming has always been about and he makes it sound so fresh – I love this solo.

After: Yep, Jeff Ballard. I love his touch on the ride cymbal. It’s particularly on display in the later part of this example. It’s like he’s dancing on the ride and tying the whole drumset together with that sound. Really fantastic drumming and musicianship.

Keep up with Austin via his website!

Blindfold Bootleg Test: Chris McCarthy

Posted in Improvisation, Musical Influences with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 14, 2015 by pogo56

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I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know this great, budding artist in Chris McCarthy over the past year. Originally from Seattle, now living in Boston, Chris has become a regular performer at Wally’s Cafe. He’s filled in wonderfully in my band on several occasions and his presence on the scene ensures that Boston will remain a stronghold for great pianists! Here’s Chris’s guesses/responses to the blindfold test:

Example 1: Fred Hersch, Nobody Else But Me, live in NYC in duo with Mark Turner (year unknown).

Within a couple of bars my instinct told me this was Aaron Parks. This reminds me a lot of the “Alive in Japan” recordings Aaron put on his website last year; where he achieves a great freedom with standard tunes and harmony. However, the touch is more percussive than I’ve heard Aaron play usually, so I’m not totally convinced it’s him.

After: My comment about the touch being “percussive” seems pretty strange knowing that it’s Fred Hersch! But listening back to the recording, there are a lot of things that should have clued me into who it was; the amazing voice leading, stretching of the form, fluid technique, all essential parts of Fred’s style. Fred has been an incredible teacher and mentor for me at NEC, and I hope he’s not offended I didn’t get this right!

Example 2: Aruan Ortiz, Ask me Now live at the Regattabar in Cambridge (year unknown)

This reminds me a lot of the sets Kenny Werner has been playing with The Fringe on Monday nights at the Lily Pad in Boston these past few months (but I doubt this is them). The interaction around the trio is great, everyone is extremely flexible and playing without an agenda of where the music should go, especially hard to do when you’re playing one of the most commonly played Monk tunes! But I’m not sure who the pianist is.

After: I saw Aruan’s group with Rez Abassi and Eric McPherson at the Winter Jazz Festival last year. Other than that I haven’t checked him out at all, and had never heard him play standards before. I’m curious to hear more.

Example 3: McCoy Tyner, Darn That Dream live at the Regattabar in Cambridge (year unknown)

My gut is telling me this is Jean Michel Pilc. He’s an incredible player, and I’ve always liked the way Pilc uses the low register of the piano in surprising ways; ‘dropping bombs’ like Horace Silver, but with more defined harmonies. I’ve also heard him use a repeated note figure as a basis for re-harmonization, and a lot of the cascading runs tells me this is someone with outrageous piano technique (such as Pilc).

After: Well that makes sense. No one makes better use of “dropping bombs” in the low register and has more outrageous technique than McCoy!

Example 4: Aaron Goldberg, Impressions live in Portugal with Nicholas Payton.

This band is dealing! It’s an interesting recording because the pianist starts out playing very lyrically. But then as soon as he gets into playing the 4th block chords the vocabulary gets so close to McCoy that I can’t really discern who it is. However, this is certainly an issue I can relate to; if I’m playing “Impressions” at a medium up tempo on a gig, all of my McCoyisms will come out whether I like it or not. The player’s melodic sense is great throughout the solo, and he’s putting the groove first, never overplaying. Xavier Davis is my guess, but whoever it is sounds truly great.

After: I’m surprised! This solo is a lot more restrained than what I’ve heard from Aaron, and also more straight ahead than I associate with his style. I’d love to hear more of him in this context.

Example 5: Leo Genovese, Berlin (Jason Palmer) live in NYC with Jason Palmer Septet

Jason, isn’t this a recording of “Berlin?” Lol! Some of the lines are really surprising harmonically. Sounds like it could be Aaron Parks, if it’s not him someone definitely influenced by him; the use of space and development of ideas reminds me of Aaron, but the melodic and harmonic content sound like someone different. Sam Harris?

After: I’ve only heard Leo on Esperanza’s records, (where he sounds great) but seeing as this solo is bad ass, I need to check out more!

Example 6: Gerald Clayton, Blues live at Jazz Gallery NYC with Patrick Cornelius Octet (2013).

Sounds like it could be Glenn Zaleski, but it’s hard to say; maybe Gerald Clayton? Nothing I heard really made me think of anyone in particular, the playing was very nice, but it sounded like it could have been a great deal of pianists from the 2000s.

After: I got one! I’ve always loved Gerald’s playing, everything he plays has a very strong vocal quality and he’s got an amazing feel.

Example 7: Dave Kikoski, Mr. Day live in Xalapa Mexico with Jason Palmer, Francisco Mela, Emilliano Cornel (2013).

Sounds like Aaron Goldberg’s trio. Aaron has amazing rhythmic vocabulary, and here he’s playing some melodic patterns that I associate with him. He’s also great at prolonging tension throughout a solo, which is definitely happening on this recording.

After: I’ve been checking out a lot of Kikoski recently. He has a trio record with Eric Revis and Jeff Watts that is off the charts. However I still maintain this recording sounds a lot like Aaron Goldberg’s trio.

Check out Chris’s music here!

Blindfold Bootleg Series: Julian Shore

Posted in Improvisation, Musical Influences with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 14, 2015 by pogo56

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Julian Shore is one of THOSE players.  And by that I mean that if you listen with intent to what he’s playing on the bandstand, you will often find yourself shaking your head in disbelief.  I’ve had the great fortune of making music with this fine gentleman for the past several years, most recently on a spring US tour with bassist Michael Feinberg’s Humblebrag.  Here’s Julian’s Test:


I do want to preface this with how difficult this was for me, given the wealth of influences present in so many pianists nowadays… A lot of these bootlegs sound like they’re pretty recent. Also I utterly stink at identifying modern pianists. I’ll do my best, but I’m not really certain with any of these! I just sort of stream-of-conciousness-ed them as I went along. I mostly just tried to pick out the influences I heard in each player, rather than definitively say one way of the other.

Example 1:  Fred Hersch, Nobody Else But Me,  live in NYC in duo with Mark Turner (year unknown).

1. My initial reaction is this sounds like Fred Hersch, so if it’s not Fred it’s someone very influenced by him. The touch sounds a little aggressive for Fred so maybe it’s not him (or maybe it’s the recording). But the material sure fits. Great contrapuntal playing between the hands, and that same bouncy feel. Even moving up to the high register with those little syncopations sounds like him. It’s slightly lacking in his normal sense of insane control at the end there I suppose, but maybe he’s just reaching for stuff. Either way it sounds fantastic whoever it is!
After:  Very cool. Fred’s really sounding so strong here, I’m curious when the recording is from. Special playing!
Example 2:  Aruan Ortiz, Ask me Now live at the Regattabar in Cambridge (year unknown)
2. Same sort of thing with the last one, only this sounds very much like Jason Moran to me. Lots of phrases and ideas I’ve heard from Jason before, and the interplay/use of space fits. Lots of cool, oblique phrases that abruptly change directions and are pulling from a very non-tonal place. And the time’s stretching all over the place. It’s nice to hear this kind of treatment of Ask Me Now, which is played so much these days. I really like it, very unique playing and it sounds like they’re really searching and playing without fear. Just playing what they’re hearing, and it’s great material. 
After:  Ahhh Aruan! Wow, I haven’t heard him in a while, but he’s always been a phenomenal player. Listening back, I’m pretty surprised I had such strong pull to Jason’s name. I think some confirmation bias took over! Regardless, it’s a free, organic and beautiful performance.
Example 3:  McCoy Tyner, Darn That Dream live at the Regattabar in Cambridge (year unknown)

3. This one sounds like an older musician to me. The facility and pedal control sound like they’ve taken a hit over the years, but it’s still a great performance. Nice dynamics and a bit of arrangement to Darn That Dream. That big, booming left-hand is really reminiscent of McCoy’s solo piano playing, especially at the end with the right hand chordal stuff. Definitely reminds me of that, but without the furious pentatonic fills that usually accompany it. Also some of the lefthand voice movement is throwing me off. George Cables maybe? 

After:  Yeah, that left hand was kind of a giveaway for McCoy. But he is really sounding great here, even though it must be quite late into his career. Certainly a departure from his earlier solo records that I’ve heard.

Example 4:  Aaron Goldberg, Impressions live in Portugal with Nicholas Payton.

4. If this isn’t Aaron Goldberg, it’s someone very influenced by him. A lot of his trademark solo material littered throughout, as well as his touch and feel. Or maybe this is one of the guys who influenced Aaron! What do I know…. Also plenty of Kenny Kirkland influence as well. Very much coming out of that 80’s/early 90’s style of jazz piano, so it’s someone inspired by that tradition (which is obviously coming out of McCoy). Could be one of those 90’s guys. Beats me! But it’s swinging and has a lot of energy so it’s fun to listen to. 

After:  Yep, Aaron sounding great as always. He’s as rock solid as they come, always so strong and controlled. Nasty!

Example 5:  Leo Genovese, Berlin (Jason Palmer)  live in NYC with Jason Palmer Septet

5. This is one of your tunes Jason, right? ‘Berlin’ maybe? I can’t remember… I think I’ve played it before once. This guy or gal sounds like they’re coming out of Herbie, not that they’re sounding like a clone or anything. That 3-2-1 minor scale thing Herbie does is present in the beginning, and then it diverges into some really interesting line playing. A little time-stretchy sometimes, and it phases in and out of the harmony creatively which I like. Lots of chops, strong playing! I’m going to guess Cedric here maybe? 

After:  To be honest I’m a little shocked this is Leo! He’s always been such a chameleon, but even then, this one seems uncharacteristic. He was actually my piano teacher in high school (via Hal Crook), though I was a total slacker (Sorry Leo!). He’s long been a huge inspiration to me, and one of my very favorite musicians. Seeing him play with Hal every week in RI was one of the biggest reasons I got into playing jazz. Sad I didn’t get this one!

Example 6: Gerald Clayton, Blues live at Jazz Gallery NYC with Patrick Cornelius Octet (2013).

6. Definitely someone who’s been listening to Paul Bley (one of my favorites!). Similar feel and variation of touch to his lines. Some of his ‘licks.’ One of the few modern guys I can think of who’s REALLY coming out of Paul is Aaron Parks, who I also love. At first I thought it might be Aaron, but then he or she plays some uncharacteristic things there at the end, pulling from Herbie and other more usual-suspect jazz piano language. Maybe a really polished younger guy who’s still sewing his influences together? I haven’t heard a whole lot from him, but I’ve always really enjoyed his playing so maybe Christian Li? Or Luke? I’m going to feel like an idiot if I’m way off-base here… Could easily be a veteran with how great the playing is (like Gerald Clayton or something).

After:  Hah! Look at that… I really thought this was Gerald, but the young kids are all sounding so great these days, and they really seem to be pulling from a similar set of influences. Thought you might be getting sneaky! And of course Gerald is still very young. He’s just incredible… brilliant player.

Example 7:  Dave Kikoski, Mr. Day live in Xalapa Mexico with Jason Palmer, Francisco Mela, Emilliano Coronel (2013).

7. More of the pentatonic-based “power piano” playing we heard in example four, but this time pulling even harder from Kenny and McCoy. Very on-top, percussive feel; pulling the rhythm section along for the ride 🙂 Maybe Joey Calderazzo? For a second I thought it might be Orrin Evans out of the sheer strength of the playing, but I really don’t think it’s him. Danny Grissett maybe? I’m not very well versed with the material unfortunately, I feel like this one should be really obvious to me. Really no clue, but it’s someone who’s terrific at this style! Really impressive piano playing.

After:  Of course, Kikoski. Don’t know how his name slipped my mind, he’s a perfect fit. Beast of a pianist!

Julian has several great recordings out, one of my favorites being Filaments.  Keep up with the latest happenings with Julian by visiting his website!

List of Upcoming Performances!

Posted in Performance with tags , , , , , , , on January 16, 2015 by pogo56

Hello everyone,

Here’s a list of performances for those who are interested:

1/11 SUNDAY 8:30pm
Patrick Cornelius Octet
Cornelia Street Cafe

1/13 TUESDAY 7pm
City of Poets
Joe’s Pub (APAP)

1/16 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

1/17 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

1/23 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

1/24 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

1/27 TUESDAY 8pm
Lee Fish Group
Beat Hotel (Music of Wayne Shorter)

1/30 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

1/31 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

2/6 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

2/7 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

2/20 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

2/21 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

2/27 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

2/28 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

3/6 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

3/7 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

3/13 FRIDAY 9:30pm
George Burton Quintet
Smalls NYC

3/14 SATURDAY 9:30pm
George Burton Quintet
Smalls NYC

3/20 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

3/21 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

3/27 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

3/28 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

4/2 THURSDAY TBA
Melissa Oliveira +JAM
Portugal

4/3 FRIDAY TBA
Melissa Oliveira +JAM
Portugal

4/4 SATURDAY TBA
Melissa Oliveira +JAM
Portugal

4/5 SUNDAY TBA
Melissa Oliveira +JAM
Portugal

4/6 MONDAY TBA
Melissa Oliveira +JAM (Recording)
Portugal

4/10 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

4/11 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

4/15 WEDNESDAY 8pm
Noah Preminger Band
The Beat Hotel, Cambridge

4/17 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

4/18 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

4/24 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

4/25 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

5/6 WEDNESDAY 10:30pm
Noah Preminger 5tet
NP, JP, Ben Monder, Kim Cass, and Rudy Royston
Smalls, NYC

5/8 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

5/9 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston
5/22 FRIDAY 9:30pm

5/15 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

5/16 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

5/22 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

5/23 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

5/29 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

5/30 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

6/5 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

6/6 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

6/12 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

6/13 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

6/19 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet Feat. The Cloudmakers Trio
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

6/20 SATURDAY 5pm
Jason Palmer Quartet Feat. The Cloudmakers Trio
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

6/23 TUESDAY 8pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
The Beehive, Boston

6/26 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

6/27 SATURDAY 9:30
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

7/3 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

7/4 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

7/10 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

7/11 SATURDAY 2pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Soular Jazz Festival

7/11 8pm
Godwin Louis Band
The Jazz Gallery, NYC

7/17 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

7/18 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

7/22 WEDNESDAY 8:15PM
Revolutionary Snake Ensemble
MFA, Boston

7/24 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

7/25 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

7/26 SUNDAY 12pm
The Toth Brothers
Cambridge Jazz Festival

7/31 FRIDAY TBA
Matana Robert’s Coin Coin
Newport Jazz Festival
Newport, RI

7/31 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

8/1 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

8/4 TUESDAY 8pm
Noah Preminger Band
The Beehive, Boston

8/7 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

8/8 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

8/12-23 TBA
Alexey Podymkin 5tet
TBA Russia

8/28 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

8/29 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

9/4 FRIDAY 8pm
Noah Preminger Band
The Side Door, CT

9/5 Saturday 7:10pm
Mark Turner Quartet
Chicago Jazz Festival
Jay Pritzker Pavilion

9/6 SUNDAY TBA
Darcy James Secret Society
Virginia Tech, VA

9/7 MONDAY TBA
Darcy James Secret Society
Virginia Tech, VA

9/8 TUESDAY TBA
Darcy James Secret Society
Virginia Tech, VA

9/9 WEDNESDAY TBA
Darcy James Secret Society
Virginia Tech, VA

9/10 THURSDAY TBA
Darcy James Secret Society
Virginia Tech, VA

9/11 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

9/12 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

9/16 WEDNESDAY TBA
Jamie Baum Septet
Jazz Expansions

Portland, ME
9/17 THURSDAY 8pm
Jamie Baum Septet

Scullers, Boston

9/18 FRIDAY TBA
Jamie Baum Septet
Vermont Jazz Center

9/19 SATURDAY TBA
Jamie Baum Septet
Lake George Jazz Fest, NY

9/22 TUESDAY 7pm
Bruno Raberg Group
Berklee DFH, Boston

9/24 THURSDAY
Ambrose Akinmusire BB (rehearsal)
Hyde Park, IL

9/25 FRIDAY
Ambrose Akinmusire BB (rehearsal)
Hyde Park, IL

9/26 SATURDAY
Ambrose Akinmusire BB
Hyde Park Jazz Festival, IL

9/30 WEDNESDAY TBA
Cheryl Bailey Sextet
Worcester, MA

10/1 THURSDAY TBA
Darcy James Secret Society
Stanford Live, Palo Alto, Ca

10/2 FRIDAY TBA
Darcy James Secret Society
Stanford Live, Palo Alto, Ca

10/3 SATURDAY TBA
Darcy James Secret Society
Stanford Live, Palo Alto, Ca

10/9 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

10/10 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

10/14 WEDNESDAY 10pm
Noah Preminger Quartet
Smalls, NYC (Live Recording)

10/16 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

10/17 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

10/23 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

10/24 SATURDAY 8pm
Coltrane Memorial Concert
Northeastern University

10/30 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

10/31 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

11/3 TUESDAY 8PM
Lee Fish Group
Sahara Club, Methuen, Ma

11/5 THURSDAY 8PM
Elan Meher (TJ and the Revenge)
The Beat Hotel, Cambridge

11/6 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

11/7 SATURDAY 6-9PM
Jason Palmer Quartet
Steppin Out, Boston

11/7 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

11/12 THURSDAY TBA
Darcy James Secret Society
Krannert Center, Urbana, Il

11/13 FRIDAY TBA
Darcy James Secret Society
Krannert Center, Urbana, Ill

11/14 SATURDAY TBA
Darcy James Secret Society
Krannert Center, Urbana, Il

11/20 FRIDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

11/21 SATURDAY 9:30pm
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

11/27 FRIDAY 10:30pm
George Burton Quintet
Small’s Jazz Club, NYC

11/28 SATURDAY 10:30pm
George Burton Quintet
Small’s Jazz Club, NYC

12/3 THURSDAY TBA
Recording w/Mike Moreno, Edward Perez, and Lee Fish
NJ

12/4 FRIDAY 9:30PM
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

12/6 SUNDAY 5PM
Guest w/NCCU Jazz Band
Greensboro, NC

12/9 WEDNESDAY TBA
Recording w/Noah Preminger
Side Door, CT

12/10 THURSDAY TBA
Recording w/Noah Preminger
Side Door, CT

12/11 FRIDAY 9:30PM
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

12/12 SATURDAY 9:30PM
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

12/16 WEDNESDAY 8PM
Noah Preminger Quartet
The Beehive, Boston

12/18 FRIDAY 9:30PM
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

12/19 SATURDAY 9:30PM
Jason Palmer Quartet
Wally’s Jazz Cafe, Boston

12/31 THURSDAY 8pm
Grace Kelly Quintet
Sculler’s Jazz Club, Boston

2/1 MONDAY TBA
Mark Turner Quartet
Univ. of New Hampshire

2/3 WEDNESDAY TBA
Mark Turner Quartet
Bucknell Univ., PA

I hope to see some of you all out there!

JP

Funny Miles Story

Posted in Performance with tags , , , , , , on November 12, 2011 by pogo56

One of my professors in college just told me a funny story about meeting Miles on several occasions.

The first time he met Miles was in Detroit at a club called the Minor Key. He was about 15 at the time and was already playing saxophone. He went to a matinee show and afterwards he saw Miles standing alone and decided to approach him and ask for his autograph. He didn’t have a program or a record for him to sign with him so he reached in his pocket to see what he had. He pulled out his musician’s union card.

So he approaches Miles, introduces himself, and tells Miles that he plays saxophone. He then asked if Miles would sign his union card. Miles took the union card out of his hand, takes a look at it, ripped it in half, and gave it back to him.

Decades later, my professor was in Boston playing with a big band. The leader of the band happened to be good friends with Miles. Miles’ band was also in town and the big band had a night off during one of Miles’ performances. So the bandleader asked my professor is he would like to go and meet Miles. Trying to put the past behind him, he agreed.

So they arrive backstage at Miles’ show and Miles is sitting down on a huge black beanbag and the room is fairly full of people. The bandleader goes up to Miles, greets him, and then introduced Miles to my professor. By this time it’s pretty quiet in the room and all the attention is focused on the three of them.

Professor goes on to tell Miles the details about the first time they actually met back in Detroit at the Minor Key. To that, Miles responded, “I wouldn’t do no shit like that!!”

Latest Review of Nothing to Hide by Russ Musto

Posted in jazz trumpet music, Performance with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 1, 2011 by pogo56


Nothing To Hide
Jason Palmer (SteepleChase)

Despite possessing a pure tone, virtuoso technique
and wide-ranging knowledge of the jazz canon, Jason
Palmer remains relatively unheralded.

Nothing To Hide, a fine followup to his impressive debut of originals Songbook, shows a similar adventurousness on a program of imaginative interpretations of classics by Miles Davis, Clifford Brown, Donald Byrd, Lee Morgan, Freddie Hubbard and Booker Little, along with two of his own pieces performed with his regular working quintet of altoist Mike Thomas, guitarist Greg Duncan, bassist Lim Yang and drummer Lee Fish.

Opening with Byrd’s “Fly Little Bird Fly” Palmer
quickly demonstrates his innovative personality as an
arranger. Slowing down the tempo and changing the
time signature to a swinging 5/4 he makes the piece
his own, an excellent vehicle for his thoughtful
improvising, complemented by Thomas’ fiery alto.
Similarly intrepid orchestrations of Brown’s “Larue”
(interpolating the composer’s “Delilah” and an
original bass figure), Morgan’s “The Gigolo” (in 9/4
with another original bassline), Hubbard’s “Luana”
(slowing the tempo and melding it with his own
“Lower 9th Ward”) and Davis’ “Half Nelson”
(arranged by Fish in 9/4) display a penetrating
individuality. Only on Booker Little’s “Strength and
Sanity” does Palmer remain faithful to the original,
revealing a deep respect for the late trumpeter, whose
influence on his own compositional style is evident on
the originals “Nothing To Hide” and “Here And Now”

-the date’s most forward-looking entries.
At the Jazz Gallery Dec. 9th, the group (Mitsuru
Yoshizumi subbing for Yang) performed two sets of
intriguing originals and orchestrations (mainly
arrangements of songs by funk futurist Janelle Monáe)
that clearly identified Palmer as a visionary player
with an astounding vocabulary, playing music in a
uniquely personal voice, which while steeped in the
feats of the past, pushes inexorably towards tomorrow.

For more information, visit steeplechase.dk. Palmer is at
Jazz Standard Jan. 25th with Grace Kelly